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abroad, he is weak at home. it's john major all over again. >> his position is completely incredible. he says he wants a cut in the e.u. budget, but he doesn't sanction a veto. we've made clear we will use the veto as i've used it before, so let me ask him, will you use the vie toe -- veto. >> order. order. i won't be using the veto, and i will ask the prime minister, about the tenth time i've asked him to respect parliamentary procedure in this matter. >> thank you, mr. speaker. the -- [inaudible] region faces many challenge, particularly with the announcement of job losses at ford last week. will my right honorable friend agree with me that the case for a city deal for south hampton and portsmouth is particularly compelling? >> i do think it is particularly compelling that we make sure south hampton has a city deal. i understand they are on the list. obviously, the news from ford was very disappointing. it was black spot in otherwise a very, very strong performance by the british automotive industry, and i know the business secretary will be working very closely with the city council t
to strengthen our reserves and cut taxes for every hoosier. but, john, you just said we pay for things in indiana, okay in but when you were speaker of the house, for five of the six years that you were running the statehouse, indiana ran deficits. when mitch daniels came into power just a couple years later, indiana was $700 million in debt and had a deficit of $820 million. you know, john, facts are stubborn things, and i'd just like to know from my colleagues on stage how are with we going to make sure and preserve the fiscal integrity of the state of indiana? >> congressman if you'd spend the last 12 years in indiana rather than congress, you'd know our budget has to be balanced according to our constitution. i've balanced and produced bipartisan balanced budgets and, oddly, these you talk about, they were supported by fort wayne's own david long and our lieutenant governor, becky skillman. i find it almost laughable that a united states congressman would lecture anybody about fiscal responsibility. you voted not once, not twice, but five times, congressman, you voted -- and the re
] >> thank you for your kind introduction, president john degoiia. the korea economic institute is very honored to be a cosponsor of the distinguished panel of the united states current and past assistant secretaries of state for east asian and pacific affairs. i can think of no better partners than the edmonds school of foreign services and president john degoiia and georgetown university to share this unique platform to explore the future of the united states policies in the asia-pacific. i really do think that the 21st century will be seen as an asia-pacific century, much of the economic dynamism and growth will emerge from this region. and, of course, many of the toughest global challenges as well. the rise of china, the prospects of asian economic integration, and, of course, the security problems on the korean peninsula, to name a few. u.s. leadership in continuous engagement in this region will be critical in these and many more issues ahead. as the president of the economic institute, i think the tremendous past contribution of these notable assistant secretaries of state to the
. most recently by john conyers. again, h.r. 676 is a medicare for all legislation, and we should not medicare the way it is and use medicare for all. and i think the medicare for all would transfer $560 billion that right now going to the bureaucracy and the monopoly process of drug companies take care. because what we have right now is not a health care system. we have a sick care system that is focused on insurance company profits that only go up when they deny us care. the best way to stabilize health care costs if you take the and put them in a medicare for all system. i just wanted to go toward reform for just one second. i would suggest ann marie buerkle discuss tort reform with senator defrancisco was said that tort reform is not a problem and that medical malpractice insurance only contributes very slightly to health care costs. with a medicare for all system we wouldn't have to worry about tort reform. we would not have a lawsuit that would cover care. >> moderator: thank you. with 30 seconds for you, dan maffei to rebut. maffei: i think it's important and we talks about
and financial regulations at the john f. kennedy school of government. this is just under an hour. >> i'm a member of the faculty here at the kennedy school at a romani school of business and government. it's a pleasure to welcome all of you to this year's lecture, which is funded by nasd, which is now in the, the private broker of the u.s. industry. the focus is on financial regulation and each year we have had a leading public official responsible in some ways for u.s. regulation. this year, our speaker is a tiny bit of a stretch, but not really much at all. ed haldeman was ceo of freddie mac from a 2009 to just a few months ago. while in that role, ed was not really a formal regulator. he was responsible for running a very large public financial institution. freddie mac and its sibling, fannie mae are what are called government-sponsored entities, gics. for years described as private companies at the public mission of supporting housing or more simply, as mixed public-private enterprises. but in september 2008, both institutions failed financially. they were placed in government cons
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5